Q&A: What is the relationship between MSP and Shoreline Master Programs?

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Q:

What is the relationship between MSP and Shoreline Master Programs?

A:

The MSP and SMPs for Washington’s Pacific Coast share many common traits and are compatible planning processes that can be mutually beneficial. The MSP can provide information and analysis on ocean resources and uses and policy recommendations for local shoreline comprehensive updates or future local program amendments. SMPs can be a source of information for the MSP and provide a detailed implementation mechanism for the MSP in state waters.

The data and information products from the MSP’s initial stages can contribute to the ocean component of a local coastal shoreline inventory, analysis, and characterization. Once the draft marine spatial plan is completed, the resulting informational maps, recommended environment designations, and policies can be assessed and further refined by a local jurisdiction for the SMP’s environment designations, policies and regulations, and for use in the cumulative impacts analysis.

Further, local SMPs on Washington’s Pacific Coast are required to address the Ocean Management Guidelines. The Ocean Management Guidelines are state regulations that provide specific guidance on how to address ocean uses within a local SMP. Since the MSP law requires the integration and use of existing authorities, the Ocean Management Guidelines’ policies will also be incorporated into the information, analysis, and recommendations in the final MSP.

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

Q&A: What’s the process for Washington to use federal consistency to review federal license or federal permit in federal waters?

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Q:

What’s the process for Washington to use federal consistency to review federal license or federal permit in federal waters?

A:

Under Washington’s Coastal Zone Management Program, the Washington State Department of Ecology can seek authority to review a federal permit or license activity in federal waters in one of two ways:

  1. request approval from NOAA to review a federal permit or license in federal waters on a case-by-case basis
  2. amend its CZMP to describe specific geographic areas in federal waters (called a geographic location description or GLD) where specified federal license or permit activities would be automatically subject to state review.

(See 15 C.F.R. §§ 930.53 and 930.54).

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

Q&A: How do Shoreline Master Programs apply to federal consistency decisions for federal actions in state waters?

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Q:

How do Shoreline Master Programs apply to federal consistency decisions for federal actions in state waters?

A:

The Shoreline Management Act contains enforceable policies that have been incorporated into Washington’s CZMP. When a federal action occurs in state waters, the federal consistency review must evaluate how that action is consistent with the enforceable policies in the SMA and its regulations.

The state’s federal consistency review can be informed and guided by policies and standards within local
Shoreline Master Programs that the state has approved and adopted. The review can include consultation with the local government with jurisdiction where the federal action is occurring. While the state may consider local SMPs, any federal consistency objection by the state must be based on the enforceable policies in the
SMA and regulations.

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

New! Final Report Released: Economic Analysis to Support Marine Spatial Planning in Washington

Posted by & filed under Economic Analysis, Reports.

Cascade Economics completed an analysis of the economies of Washington’s coastal communities. The economic analysis provides the tools and data to characterize baseline conditions for ocean uses and their important relationships to coastal communities on the Washington coast, and can be used to evaluate the economic consequences of proposed uses or planning options in the future.

The final report includes:

  • An economic profile of the Washington coast;
  • Economic profiles of coastal tribal communities;
  • Profiles of current marine sectors;
  • An analysis of ecosystem services;
  • A social well-being assessment;
  • A risk and vulnerability assessment; and
  • A qualitative analysis of potential new uses.

Economic Analysis Graphic
 
The final report provides several tables of with overall impact of a current marine sector from potential new human uses. The above figure shows the current marine sector, the report lists potential impacts for each sector, then compares and documents the potential impacts of potential new uses.

For more information, read the Executive Summary or the Final Economic Analyisis Report

Q&A: What is “federal consistency”?

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Q:

What is “federal consistency”?

A:

Under the federal Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (CZMA), Section 307 is the “federal consistency” provision that gives a coastal state Washington Department of Ecology administers the state’s CZMP and is responsible for implementing the state’s coastal management program and conducting federal consistency reviews. The specific type of federal action will determine whether a consistency determination or certification is required and what procedures must be followed to demonstrate consistency with the enforceable policies of Washington’s CZMP.

Ecology then reviews the federal action for consistency and either a strong voice, that it would not otherwise have, inbfederal agency decision-making for activities that may affect the coastal uses or resources of a state’s coastal zone. Generally, federal consistency requires that federal actions (which includes federally-permitted actions and federal government projects), within and outside the coastal zone, which have reasonably foreseeable effects on any coastal use (land or water) or natural resource of the coastal zone be consistent with the enforceable policies of a state’s federally approved coastal zone management program (CZMP).

Washington Department of Ecology administers the state’s CZMP and is responsible for implementing the state’s coastal management program and conducting federal consistency reviews. The specific type of federal action will determine whether a consistency determination or certification is required and what procedures must be followed to demonstrate consistency with the enforceable policies of Washington’s CZMP. Ecology then reviews the federal action for consistency and either concurs with, concurs with conditions, or objects. See NOAA’s regulations at 15 C.F.R. Part 930 and NOAA’s Federal Consistency Overview document for additional information about federal consistency and enforceable policies.

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

Q&A: What is Washington’s coastal zone?

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Q:

What is Washington’s coastal zone?

A:

Under its Coastal Zone Management Plan, Washington’s coastal zone covers the full extent of 15 coastal counties, including offshore to 3 nautical miles and all inland areas of the county. Washington’s coastal zone counties are: Clallam, Grays Harbor, Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish, Thurston, Whatcom and Wahkiakum.

The coastal zone has diverse regions: the Pacific Ocean coastal area including its estuaries and uplands; the Puget Sound basin including the upland areas to the crest of the Cascade Mountain range; and the lower Columbia River and its uplands.

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

Q&A: What is the jurisdiction of Washington State and local governments under the Shoreline Management Act?

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Q:

What is the jurisdiction of Washington State and local governments under the Shoreline Management Act?

A:

Washington State has jurisdiction in state waters from the shore out to three nautical miles (n.m.). The regulatory function of a local Shoreline Master Program depends on a local jurisdiction’s geographic boundaries. For counties on Washington’s Pacific Coast, westward regulatory limit of a Shoreline Master Program is the same as the extent of Washington’s state waters — three n.m. offshore.
The federal government maintains jurisdiction from 3 to 200 n.m. offshore. The Shoreline Management Act, Ocean Resources Management Act, and the Ocean Management Guidelines do not authorize local shoreline permitting in federal waters and do not authorize local policies for federal waters or federal agencies.
The planning function of a SMP may look beyond the territorial limits of shorelines of the state to adjacent lands (see also SMP Handbook Chapter 2: Shoreline Management Overview, Chapter 5: Shoreline Jurisdiction and Chapter 7: Inventory and Characterization). For example, the shoreline inventory and characterization for an SMP should include consideration of ecosystem-wide processes and functions that pertain to shorelines, but which are often outside of shoreline jurisdiction.

For more information, read the Department of Ecology’s summary of the Coastal Zone Management Act.

Economic Workshop

Posted by & filed under Economic Analysis, WCMAC.

Join Cascade Economics for an in-depth discussion about the Washington Coast draft economic report. Input from the workshop may assist in guiding the final draft of the report.
 
What:

  • Economic Profile of the Coast
  • Economic Profile of Washington Coast Tribes
  • Recreation and Tourism
  • Commercial Fishing on the Washington Coast
  • Recreational Fishing
  • Social Impact Analysis
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Aquaculture on the Washington Coast

Why:
Cascade Economics drafted an economic analysis to enable a deeper understanding of the elements of the ocean economy and assist in the development of Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan.

Who:
Cascade Economics, local government officials, Washington Sea Grant, Washington State Departments of Ecology and Natural Resources, and coastal community members that are interested in the project.

When:
June 1 at the Grays Harbor City Hall at 2:30pm.
 

For more infomation, view the presentation, read the project detailed recommendations or the full Scope of Work
 
 

Social Indicators Workshop & Marine Resources Committee Meeting

Posted by & filed under MRC, Reports, Washington Sea Grant.

Join the North Coast Marine Resources Committee meeting for a presentation from and discussion hosted by Washington Sea Grant’s social scientist, Melissa Poe.

Human Well-Being
 
What:

  • Learn about the human well-being assessment project methods.
  • Discuss the draft conceptual model results for the northern coastal counties, which were built from an analysis of 2012-2013 stakeholder workshop notes.
  • Provide input on the suite of indicators that show the well-being on human conditions in coastal communities that rely on Washington’s waters.
  • Ask Washington Sea Grant about the project.

Why:
The workshop provides an opportunity for coastal communities to identify social indicator data gaps and provide input to a very important project.

Who:
Washington Sea Grant, the North Coast Marine Resources Committee, local government officials, and coastal community members that are interested in the project.

When/Where:

 
 

Final Report Released: Washington Ocean and Coastal Recreation Study

Posted by & filed under Reports.

​The Surfrider Foundation, in partnership with Point 97 and the state of Washington, recently completed a study on the non-consumptive recreational uses along Washington’s coast. Results show that survey respondents spent an average of $117.14 per coastal visit on things such as food, lodging, transportation, and shopping.

Each year, recreation brings $481 million dollars to Washington’s economy in trip related expenditures and Washington residents make an estimated 4.1 million trips to the coast each year. The study estimates that nearly 2.46 million trips to the coast every year are primarily for recreation.

The most popular activities include going to the beach, enjoying the scenery, viewing wildlife, taking photographs, and hiking or biking.

most popular recreational activities
 
The study shows the extensive geographic use and activity of recreation along the Washington coast and demonstrates the significant economic and social benefits that tourism bring to coastal communities.

 

For more information: