Q & A: What current uses will be included in the plan?

Posted by & filed under News, Questions and Answers.

Q:

What current uses will be included in the plan?

A:

A wide range of important coastal and ocean uses currently occur on Washington’s coast such as fishing, shipping, recreation, shellfish aquaculture, and military training. Understanding these current uses is critical to plan for the future.

As part of the marine spatial planning process, several projects are contributing better data and information about these current uses. The list below highlights a few examples of these projects:

The marine spatial plan will include chapters that provide information and maps of current uses on Washington’s coast.

For more information on current and past projects for Marine Spatial Planning, read the various Scopes of Work on the MSP Projects page or view the data through the MSP mapping application.

 
 

Q & A: What is the study area for the plan?

Posted by & filed under News, Questions and Answers.

Q:

What is the study area for the plan?

A:

The study area for Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan is approximately 7,700 square miles and includes:

  • Washington’s marine waters along the Pacific Ocean from Cape Flattery south to Cape Disappointment and from ordinary high water out to offshore areas.
  • The estuaries along the coast such as Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay.
  • A distance offshore that follows the continental shelf/slope contours at a water depth of 700 fathoms.

Planning Area

For background information on the study area selection, see the SEPA scoping document.

 
 

Q & A: What are the goals of the plan?

Posted by & filed under News, Questions and Answers.

Q:

What are the goals of the plan?

A:

The goals will help guide the overall planning process but do not alter the requirements in the law (RCW 43.372). The planning process will work to achieve all these goals in the final plan.

    Overarching goal: To ensure a resilient and healthy marine ecosystem on Washington’s coast that supports sustainable economic, recreational, and cultural opportunities for coastal communities, visitors and future generations.

    Goal 1: Protect and preserve existing sustainable uses to ensure economic vibrancy and resource access for coastal communities.

    Goal 2: Maintain maritime coastal communities from now into perpetuity.

    Goal 3: Ensure that our marine ecosystem is preserved for future generations.

    Goal 4: Develop an integrated decision making process which supports proactive, adaptive and efficient spatial planning.

    Goal 5: Encourage economic development that recognizes the aspirations of local communities and protects coastal resources.

For more details, see the list of MSP goals, with their associated objectives and actions and the SEPA document.

 
 

Giving Thanks for Seastars

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For the past year, anyone that notices changes in the marine waters has likely noticed dramatic changes to the sea stars along the west coast. Scientists and researchers have documented a rapid decline in important populations of sea stars. These populations have slowly succumbed to white lesions and eventually appear to melt to death.

Cases of the sea star wasting disease have popped up historically, but this event is unprecedented in its severity and geographic extent. Recently, scientists isolated and identified a virus commonly found in invertebrates called Star Associated Densovirus as the cause for the epidemic. There is still much to learn about the virus and what can be done to help alleviate the problem.

Let us give thanks for the scientists that identified the virus and hope that we can make a difference to the populations before it is too late.

What can you do?
Help researchers from Cornell University to track the epidemic on your beaches. Fill out this form when you find a sea star wasting away. Or this one.
 

Lessons Learned

Posted by & filed under News, Reports, Washington Sea Grant.

Are you curious about what other states have learned from their marine spatial plan?
Have you ever wondered about gaps and opportunities in the planning processes?

Well, you’re in luck!

Jennifer McCann from Rhode Island Sea Grant led an initiative supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Coastal Resources Center to transfer knowledge between marine planners. An assessment which identifies opportunities to strengthen the MSP global network and recognizes coordination opportunities that can increase efficiency and opportunities was just released.

The assessment focuses on identifying:

  • information, tools, and techniques that practitioners need;
  • effective mechanisms for delivering those materials;
  • organizations which could assist in building capacity;
  • constituencies who need the materials for implementation.
  • Washington state is highlighted as a strong example of effectively applying the MSP approach in the U.S. state waters.
     

     
     
    Read the report
    Learn about Rhode Island’s planning process

     
     

The Season to Volunteer

Posted by & filed under Events, MRC, News.

Do you enjoy walking on the beach? Are you interested in learning more about the marine natural resources in your area?

Most of us appreciate long walks on the beach and seeing the sun peak through the clouds on a rainy day. November is the perfect time to show your volunteer spirit and head to a beach near you. There are many opportunities to learn more about marine natural resources in your area while playing an active role in marine conservation.

COASST is offering trainings for new volunteers soon- don’t miss it! COASST is a citizen science project that provides long-term monitoring data on marine ecosystem health throughout Washington State. At the training, learn how to identify beached birds and conduct a survey, and sign up to monitor the beach of your choice each month. If you’re already a COASST volunteer, sign up for a marine debris training session and learn how to conduct a survey and monitor for marine debris two times each month until March 2015.

And finally, COASST is monitoring sea star wasting disease along the West Coast.
While volunteering, keep your eyes open for sea stars, both healthy and sick.

Become part of the COASST network today!

Get involved
Find a Beach
Learn about Sea Stars

 
 

What Do You Do at the Beach?

Posted by & filed under Reports, WCMAC.

In May, the Surfrider Foundation launched a survey to document the recreational use of Washington’s coast to assist with future planning of Washington’s coast. So far, over 280 surveys have been voluntarily completed.

The survey closes on October 31, 2014 so be sure to fill it out yourself and encourage anyone who recreates on the Washington coast to take the survey to help provide the most accurate data possible for the state of Washington.

Take the survey
Questions? Contact Casey Dennehy at cdennehy@surfrider.org
Need help? Watch the tutorial
 

How Does the Ocean Change With the Season?

Posted by & filed under News, Reports.

As you note changes in the land environment, you may also wonder how ocean conditions change with the seasons. New information from the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington use models and a variety of images to display the physical and chemical changes of Washington’s coastal waters throughout a typical year. These conditions show that there is a lot going on that we cannot see from the surface. The outputs from the UW lab and full report are available on the Marine Spatial Planning website under a page called “Ocean Conditions“.
 
Hypoxia Index Image
 
 
Check out the new webpage for content on bottom oxygen, hypoxia, chlorophyll, salinity, temperatures, and so much more.

 

Fish N Brew in Forks

Posted by & filed under Events, Washington Sea Grant.

Join Heritage Days “Fish N Brew” annual event at the Roundhouse in Forks. Locally caught fish and homemade brews may be entered into the competition at noon. Bring your best or most creative dish for a sure shot at the People’s Choice awards with past favorites including salmon chowder, smoked salmon, and salmon ice cream.

Be sure to swing by the Washington Sea Grant Marine Spatial Planning booth and chat with Kevin Decker.
 
Click here for more information
 
 

Where’s Kevin?

Posted by & filed under Events, MRC, Washington Sea Grant.

This weekend, look for Washington Sea Grant staff member, Kevin Decker at the 9th annual Chehalis Watershed Festival.

Come to the Morrison Riverfront Park and Rotary Log Pavilion for live music all day, a salmon bake, watershed friendly gardening tips, and a chance to climb inside a 28 foot salmon! Find Kevin and chat a bit about what Marine Spatial Planning means for your watershed.

Click here for more information