Member Spotlight: Casey Dennehy

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Casey Dennehy
WCMAC Recreation Seat
Casey is the Washington Coast Program Manager for the Surfrider Foundation. He is actively engaged in the Shoreline Master Plan updates for Grays Harbor County, is the chair of the Grays Harbor County Marine Resources Committee, sits on the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, and directs Surfrider’s Coastal Leadership Academy. Casey is an avid surfer, clammer, fisherman, mountaineer, and agate hunter. He is passionate about protecting and enjoying Washington’s coastal and marine waters.
 

 
What does Marine Spatial Planning mean to you?
Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) can be challenging to describe to those outside of the process but I feel that it is a pretty simple concept. The ocean is a busy and crowded place; the only way we can manage all the various uses effectively, or determine if a new use could co-exist with what’s already happening, is to characterize all the current uses and have that information in one place. MSP is the process of gathering all the data we have on ocean uses, putting it all together, and making informed decisions with that information.
 
How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
I became involved through the Surfrider Foundation, which advocates for MSP throughout the country. As a representative of non-consumptive recreation, I feel it is my duty to ensure that coastal recreation is valued and protected so the public can continue to enjoy the superb natural resources our state has to offer. Surfrider knew we needed information about recreational uses which did not exist, so we helped develop and launch a coastal recreational use study. We now have maps and information on where people recreate and how much money they spend. This information demonstrates the value of the coast to Washington citizens and the local economy, and provides the information to make sure areas that are valuable for non-consumptive recreation can be protected.
 
What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan offers a great opportunity to improve the way our ocean and its resources are managed. Our governments distribute management authority to various agencies, both state and federal, who often do not share information or readily communicate. The MSP process has already made great strides in pulling useful information from governments and other entities together, bringing those governments to the planning table, and allowing them to work collaboratively. Even better, they work alongside the stakeholders on the WCMAC who bring tremendous knowledge from personal and professional experience to develop a plan for the future.

My goal is for the plan to protect the valuable resources that Washington citizens enjoy and on which coastal communities depend. I hope the plan will develop a clear process for evaluating new ocean uses such as renewable energy extraction, offshore aquaculture, or anything else that may emerge in the future. And finally, I hope the evaluation process includes a thorough review by stakeholders and the WCMAC. I think these goals will help to ensure that the ocean and its resources are managed in such a way that valuable resources are preserved for the future.
 
Anything else interesting about you?
Before my work with Surfrider, I was an invasive species manager with The Nature Conservancy and an active wildland firefighter with the Center for Natural Lands Management. I also spent three years performing long-term monitoring of alpine lakes and streams at Mount Rainier National Park. While I am no longer a crew leader or participant in fire operations, the leadership and teamwork I learned from my training and experiences in each of those positions is extremely useful with my work on the coast.

Member Spotlight: Jeff Ward

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Jeff Ward
WCMAC Coastal Energy Seat
Jeff worked as the Senior Program Manager for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Sequim for over twenty eight years. He now owns his own consulting firm that specializes in environmental program design, implementation, and management. Jeff is a member of the Northwest Straits Commission, Northwest Straits Foundation, and Clallam County Marine Resources Committee. He has a vast understanding of the energy industry and the stages of permitting potential projects. Jeff is an experienced program manager and excellent representative on the WCMAC.
 
Jeff Ward
 
What does Marine Spatial Planning mean to you?
I see the MSP process as an opportunity for a variety of folks representing different stakeholder groups and interests to work collaboratively to plan for the future. The process has encouraged people to think about what is important to them, appreciate differences of opinion, and do their best to balance socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural needs to make the best possible decisions.

How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
During my final years at PNNL, I managed two projects for the US Department of Energy with direct relevance to the MSP process. The first investigated how ocean energy development and deployment might affect environmental resources in the ocean and estuaries; the second involved procuring two oceanographic buoys designed to accurately measure offshore wind speeds up to 100 meters above the ocean, and working with local, State, and Federal organizations to obtain permits for their deployment. Given this experience, I was a good fit for one of the two energy seats on WCMAC, and I was lucky enough to be appointed by the Governor.

What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
I hope we can create a living document that will be used for many years to plan for growth without sacrificing the unique characteristics of the coast that we cherish and appreciate. I think the best possible outcome will be if all of us help develop a process that provides a framework for decision-making that is science-based and inclusive, and that clearly describes the potential tradeoffs of one course of action versus another.

Anything else interesting about you?
Although Sequim is a long drive to the outer coast, I have always felt connected to the ocean, and made my living on or in the water for over three decades. With the exception of woodworking, my hobbies are mostly outdoor things (hiking, biking, kayaking, surfing). My wife and I have raised a blended family of five kids (all adults now and out of the house, thank God) that deeply appreciate nature and have a lot of fun from the mountains to the sea!

Member Spotlight: Arthur Grunbaum

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Arthur (R.D.) Grunbaum
WCMAC Conservation Seat
R.D. shows his leadership and passion through many community groups and conservation efforts. He is President of Friends of Grays Harbor and a member of the Grays Harbor Marine Resources Committee. R.D. also chairs the Newsletter Committee for the Grays Harbor Audubon Society and is the founding member and treasurer of The Grays Harbor Institute. Recently, he has been working to raise awareness and advocacy surrounding the issue of oil terminals along the coast. R.D. uses his interest in community issues and raising public awareness to successfully serve as the Program Director, co-General Manager, and co-Engineer of the community public radio stations KGHI 91.1 and KGHE 89.1. R.D. is a passionate activist who brings practical solutions and concerns to the WCMAC as the Conservation Seat.

R.D. Grunbaum

What does Marine Spatial Planning mean to you?
MSP offers the region an opportunity to recognize the marine assets we have as a community and to “future think” about the potential benefits and/or impacts of introducing new uses that may affect present functions and values.

How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
As a member of the coastal community, it is clear that protection of our beaches, estuaries, and ocean habitats begins with a careful understanding and appreciation of the ecosystem as it exists today. Introducing new uses or expanding current uses may have profound impacts to the community’s way of life, its wildlife, and its aesthetic values. We must plan for the long-term and base decisions on a balance of natural processes and human influences.

What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
I hope the plan will be a guideline that honors and respects nature, the unique tribal influence and rights within our State, and the communities themselves as sustainable entities that work in harmony with existing and future uses of our waters and their resources.

Member Spotlight: Mark Cedergreen

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Mark Cedergreen
WCMAC Recreational Fishing Seat
Mark moved to Westport with his parents in 1956 and purchased Westport Charters from his parents in 1976 after having commercially fished from California to Alaska and operated charter boats from time to time. From 1996 until he semi-retired in 2015, Mark worked for the Westport Charter Boat Association as its Executive Director.

Mark was a long standing member of the Pacific Salmon Commission’s Southern Panel and the Pacific Fishery Management Council. He and his wife, Cathy, have two children, Carrie and Chris. The entire family worked in the recreational fishing industry for many years. Mark was recently honored by induction into the Westport Sportfishing Hall of Fame. The WCMAC is honored to have Mark as the recreational fishing seat on the WCMAC.
 

 
What does Marine Spatial Planning mean to you?
Basically, it’s similar to city planning but on a much grander scale and includes diverse public and private interests that have economic, social, and cultural ties to the marine environment. Marine Spatial Planning includes government and citizen oversight of ocean spatial uses. A key component is the existence of long-standing historical uses, particularly fisheries, that must be considered and protected. Proposed new users of ocean geography need to be aware of the constraints they may face prior to initiating projects that may conflict with existing uses.

How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
Some years ago, a proposal was made to put a large wind farm off Washington’s Southwest coast. It was obvious that this project, if approved and built, would supplant some of the most productive fishing grounds on the west coast. I did some research on marine wind turbines and found that they require a large footprint, are not necessarily an efficient or cost-effective way to produce electricity, and are a very negative endeavor aesthetically. I decided to be involved in the planning process to help protect the fishing industry from those types of projects. The global report card on marine ocean energy is not all positive. Some places have replaced food providers and recreational users with energy projects that add little to the community at exorbitant cost. This situation makes no sense. I believe that a historical use is the best use and I am involved in the planning process to protect the fishing industry from costly mistakes.

What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
I hope this plan puts a very rigorous process into place for any ocean energy proposal. I want the plan to require an applicant to prove that a new ocean use is the best way to supplement Washington’s energy needs without impacting existing fishing grounds and other existing uses. Any project that requires government subsidies to initiate, expand, or continue production should not be considered the best option. The fishing industry is not willing to trade their long-standing economic and cultural benefits to coastal communities for something that likely provides no benefit to the coastal communities or Washington.
Farmers often claim, “Food doesn’t come from Safeway” and neither do fish. Fishermen need their fishing grounds in order to provide for their families long into the future. I want the Marine Spatial Plan to protect the historical fishing grounds, the food, and the jobs they provide.

Anything else interesting about you?
I have a degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the University of Washington (1968) and my first job was at Boeing working on Minuteman missiles. I think that qualifies me as a “rocket scientist”. I fished my way through college, got hooked in the process, and became a fisherman. I left Boeing in 1969 and “went back to sea”.

Member Spotlight: Larry Thevik

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Larry Thevik
WCMAC Commercial Fishing Seat
Larry is a lifetime resident of Washington State and has been the owner and/or operator of several commercial fishing vessels over the past 45 years. The last three decades he has owned and operated the fishing vessel Midnight Star. He is a member of the state appointed Washington Coastal Crab Advisory Board and one of six state appointed industry representatives to the Pacific States Marine Fish Commission’s Tri-State Crab Committee. He is vice president of the Washington Dungeness Crab Fishermen’s Association (WDCFA) headquartered in Westport and a newly appointed member of WCMAC, (replacing Ray Toste).

During Larry’s fishing career, he has trolled for salmon and jigged for albacore from California to Canada. He has pot fished for spot prawns off of Washington. He has long-lined for sablefish, rockfish, and halibut off of Oregon and Washington. And he has pot fished for Dungeness crab off of Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. Larry recently sold the Midnight Star, but is still involved in several commercial fisheries as a permit owner and continues his role as a representative of coastal commercial fishing interests.

Larry Thevik

What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
When most gaze seaward from shore, the waters of coastal Washington appear to be a vast and fallow place. To a commercial fisher and other ocean users, our coastal seascape offers a considerably different view and different characterization. Ocean user groups know from experience that our coastal marine waters are a busy, utilized, valuable, and limited space. The MSP process has very serious implications and long-lasting impacts. Any process considering displacement of any existing use needs to be thoroughly scrutinized and allow for an elevated level of stakeholder influence. Any policy which may lead to designated areas for new uses needs an accurate assessment of the utility of those uses, and a true measure of the impact on other uses. For me, the Marine Spatial Planning process carries both great risk and potential opportunity. The wrong choices could lead to significant negative impacts and I want to see us avoid them.

How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
I have travelled our coast and benefited from its beauty and bounty for 45 years. The ocean was my workplace; our estuaries part of my commute. Thousands of families, including my own, depend on the health of our marine natural resources and public access to marine waters for their livelihood. Commercial fishing is highly regulated, it is sustainable, and it is a renewable resource industry. The fishing dependent communities must be involved in MSP due to high potential impact to fishing communities, histories, and culture. I appreciate the opportunity to represent coastal commercial fishing interests in the MSP process. I am hopeful my participation will help sustain fishing families and fishing futures.

What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
Even with no regulatory authority, WCMAC members provide knowledge and experience to the MSP process. Hopefully the WCMAC can offer careful and considered recommendations that policy makers will use when making future decisions affecting our marine space. I think using the WCMAC as a forum for new information and discussion is a fundamental part of our purpose. The priority underlying all WCMAC recommendations is to protect and preserve existing sustainable uses. Existing users and stakeholders should not have to prove the worth of their case; new uses should have to prove the worth of theirs. The WCMAC cannot presume that existing uses will be valued, we need to ensure that any future alternative uses should not proceed without a true measure of benefit, potential impact, and cost. WCMAC can help provide data and experience, ensure continued stakeholder participation, and recommend guidelines for this vetting process.

Any fun fact that you would like to include?
People who have worked or traveled the ocean for an extended period of time know that the ocean is work first, fun second, and fear last but not least. As a fisher, your work is dawn to dusk and sometimes dawn to dawn. The ocean has no preference or care for your safety and well-being. It is harsh and unforgiving when in a sour mood many never tell their final tale. Pulling the bounty hidden beneath the waves is arduous and often wrought with failure, but to witness what treasure hides when found is joyful. I have watched a male orca pod leader teach his young to hunt sea lions. I have seen orcas elect to display themselves at day’s end just yards from the boat. I have stopped fishing to enjoy Grey and Humpback whales passing by, and at midnight seen the phosphorescent trails left by porpoises as they breach cresting waves in the moonlight. Working on the ocean reminds us of our place in this natural world. Fishing is a way of life. We need a thoughtful MSP process to avoid ever saying “we will fish no more forever…”

Member Spotlight: Tiffany Turner

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Tiffany Turner
WCMAC Economic Development Seat
Tiffany is the daughter of a commercial fishermen and grew up on the Peninsula. She and her husband, Brady, own The Inn at Discovery Coast, the Adrift Hotel and Pickled Fish Restaurant in Long Beach, and the Ashore Hotel in Seaside. Tiffany has an impressive resume as a member of the Pacific County Economic Development Council, the Chair of the Washington Budget and Policy Center, a board member of the Long Beach Peninsula Visitor’s Bureau, and a member of the Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Board of Directors. She was just named one of the Puget Sound Business Journal’s 40 successful people under 40 in 2015. The WCMAC is excited to welcome Tiffany as the Economic Development Seat.
Tiffany Turner

What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
To me, this process is all about making sure that we preserve the current uses of our coastal waters, while discovering other opportunities. The current uses not only provide economic vitality to our coastal communities, but they are part of our culture and a way of life. My dad is a commercial fisherman, my husband is a surfer, and our guests come to the coast to dig clams, eat oysters, and watch birds. We need to make sure that as we are examining the possibility of new uses, we are also ensuring the protection of the uses that make the Washington Coast such a unique place to live and visit.

Anything else interesting about you?
I have 2 boys; Beckett is 10 and Jaden is 12. I want to make sure that I do my part to create a better world for them.

Member Spotlight: Joshua Berger

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Joshua Berger
WCMAC Commerce Seat
Joshua started working at the Department of Commerce in November 2015 as the Economic Development Director for Washington’s maritime industry sector. Joshua brings a depth of business and economic development knowledge to his commerce seat on the WCMAC. He has been a recognized leader in several professional settings, as the Coordinator of the Washington Maritime Federation, the Maritime Sector Business Development Manager for the Seattle and King County Economic Development Council, the Program Director and Marine Operations Manager at The Evergreen State College, and the Regional and Network Coordinator for the Environmental Education Association of Washington. Joshua also worked in the towing industry and spent six years on the water with Sound Experience aboard the schooner Adventuress. With a lifelong passion for the marine transportation industry, Joshua is an excellent addition to the WCMAC.

Joshua Berger

What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
There is a confluence between our natural environment and human interactions and this is clearly shown along Washington’s Pacific coast where already we engage in so much activity. It is incumbent upon us to think clearly, critically, and inclusively to engage stakeholders on a plan, or guidelines, on how we continue to develop a sustainable approach to these interactions.

How and why did you get involved in the planning process?
As part of my role as the Governor’s Maritime Sector Lead, I act as the liaison, or conduit, between the diverse maritime sector and state agencies. I am also charged to set strategic direction for maritime economic development opportunities. The Washington Marine Coastal Advisory Council calls for representation from the Department of Commerce, therefore, it makes sense that I act as the representative.

What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
I hope the group can engage in meaningful dialogue to find concrete and agreed upon guidelines. We want to ensure that each of the ecological, economic, and cultural identities of the region are considered and find pragmatic ways in which we can accept new uses. This is an opportunity to sustainably develop new economic uses that will not only protect the resource but create prosperity and local jobs.

Anything else interesting about you?
Like many of those on the Advisory Council, I have spent many days and nights at sea along the Pacific coast. I have sailed as mate and engineer on coastwise tugs as well as been captain of several sailing ships that ply these waters. I feel strongly about the cultural and environmental value of the region and share it often with my children and visiting family. This is a unique, powerful, and sensitive area that we can manage well with integrity and progress.

Member Spotlight: Randy Lewis

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Randy Lewis
WCMAC Ports Seat

Randy is a new member of the WCMAC as the ports representative. Randy is the Director of Environmental and Engineering Services for the Port of Grays Harbor. Randy retired from the U.S. Coast Guard after 21 years of service and became the City Administrator for the City of Westport from 1998 until coming to his current position last March. He has a strong commitment to improving the city and local industries as well as great professional experiences with a variety of shoreline and land use planning processes. He is excited to apply his experiences in things like permitting, project development, and project management as the new WCMAC ports seat.

Randy Lewis

  • What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
    Effective planning involves setting a vision, goals, and outcomes that help facilitate the development of policies and regulations. These policies and regulations do more than just enforce standards, but really become a vehicle to see the plan become real over time. A very important piece of good planning is accurately identifying where you are before you set a course to get to where you want to be. That is a critical element in Marine Spatial Planning and the current work of the WCMAC, because we don’t have an existing plan or complete use analysis from which to build. Understanding who is using state waters and how those uses coordinate or are in conflict is important before discussing and planning for new uses. Creating the “picture” of where we are will be very useful, not just for planning, but for much wider applications that we probably are not aware of yet.
  • How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
    In reality, I am on the board because I replaced the previous port representative when I came to my current position and was the logical choice to be appointed. I have been involved in the MSP process since the beginning, initially in local stakeholder meetings as a representative of the City of Westport. It has been interesting to be involved in the process from both sides of the table so to speak.
  • What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
    I think it is important to recognize that the MSP is a small but important piece in much larger processes, and that any good plan must be a living document that is updated as new information or uses come to light. Since we are creating an entirely new plan, my hope is that we create a solid foundation of information and initial recommendations that will be used as a basis for future planning, and the development of policies long into the future. An important measure of success for me will be how much of this plan has to be redone during the first update. If at that time whoever does that update is able to update our work with new information and data to take the next step, then we will have succeeded.
  • Any fun fact that you would like to include?
    Personally, I love the outdoors and our coast. I also love helping people to grow and develop. When my job duties allowed, I really enjoyed volunteering as a coach and was a referee for several sports. I loved helping a young person work and practice and then master a skill they hadn’t done before and often that they didn’t believe they could. Regarding the MSP process, I was involved in all sides of the planning process during my time at the City of Westport. I have been a project developer and proponent on behalf of the city, a regulatory reviewer for the city, and a commenter on projects outside the city’s jurisdiction. That experience has helped me, at least on some level, to understand the perspective of the different parties to the entire MSP process.

Member Spotlight: Brian Sheldon

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Brian Sheldon
WCMAC Aquaculture Seat
Brian Sheldon
 
Brian is the owner of Northern Oyster Company in Willapa Bay. His family homesteaded near the shores of Willapa in the 1880′s, and his grandfather started the company in 1934. Brian’s family has been growing clams and oysters on tide flats for three to five generations depending on which side of the family tree you want to climb. He, wife Marilyn, and children Jebadiah, Estella, and Ione now operate the family farm after his parents Ruth and Dick operated it for about 40 years. He represents the aquaculture industry on the WCMAC and is an active member of the Willapa/Grays Harbor Oyster Growers Association, Pacific Coast Shellfish Grower Association, Pacific County Marine Resources Committee, the Pacific Conservation District, and was elected to the Board of the North Beach Water District.

  • What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
    MSP has the potential to be one of the most significant issues for marine users and conservation in Washington for the next several generations, and is essentially a zoning exercise in the marine area. If policy can be developed to guide the process, MSP has the potential to provide protections for our economy, culture, history, and the environment as we are pressured to allow federal energy and other projects to be placed in our nearshore ocean and coastal estuaries. However, if policy is developed without serious consideration of informed stakeholder input then MSP could be a disaster for coastal Washington communities.
  • How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
    In 2009 I became involved in MSP because I felt it was better to be at the table than on the menu. In all seriousness, shellfish growers are likely the 2nd largest private marine land owner in Washington, and have a vested interest in assuring our farms are not damaged through irresponsible marine development. Our farmed lands are proven through science to be an overall benefit to the marine environment, which is a service we provide to the public in general. Our coastal communities also have commercial fishing and other uses that are part of the foundation of our economy, history, and culture that are irreplaceable. My goal is to pursue MSP policy so as to assure existing sustainable uses are protected and preserved as a priority over other any new use. If there are new uses that can be implemented with the interests of coastal communities as the priority and that do not threaten existing uses, then we need good policy to guide development of these new uses. We simply cannot afford to make mistakes with so much at risk, so solid policy must be developed that assures we minimize risk to the uses that have essentially shaped our way of life along coastal Washington.
  • What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
    The priority is to protect and preserve existing sustainable uses, which has been the input from our communities time and again through a well vetted public process ongoing for about 6 years. If we can keep the focus on accomplishing this, then we can consider what new uses are appropriate as aligned with not degrading or threatening these existing uses, including ecological, recreational, commercial, cultural, and other types of uses. In this way we can protect what has supported our coastal communities for over a century, and at the same time develop strong policy to guide new potential uses.
  • Any fun fact that you would like to include?
    I recall the first time I heard of an energy investment group from New York trying to lease a massive area in Willapa Bay in about 1999. I looked into it and they had submitted a map of Willapa Bay with circles around large areas of shellfish grower private shellfish beds. This application was being considered by I believe the FERC without consideration to the private property and farms the lease proposal included. This was a real wake up call to me, and I contact Brian Baird who took action to assure there was no reckless action taken. I also recall a time when our local PUD had developed plans to burry cables through our beds in a bay power crossing without any discussion with shellfish growers. These types of actions combined with what appears to be a focus on the SW coast for federal energy projects are issues that made me realize that MSP was a real issue that we needed to get ahead of.

Member Spotlight: Garrett Dalan

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Garrett Dalan
WCMAC Chairperson and Grays Harbor Marine Resources Committee Seat
Garrett Dalan

Garrett recently joined The Nature Conservancy as the Washington Coast Conservation Coordinator and was appointed to the Grays Harbor County Marine Resource Committee (GHC MRC). For the decade prior he worked for the Grays Harbor County Division of Environmental Health, which included being the staff coordinator for the GHC MRC since its creation in 2009. Garrett strives to build strong working relationships throughout the coastal communities. He also serves as the WCMAC representative on the Marine Resources Advisory Council (MRAC).
Garrett grew up on the Olympic Peninsula and lives in Montesano with his awesome wife and four, hopefully awesome, kids.

  • What does marine spatial planning mean to you?
    This may very well be the key question of this planning process. My short answer would be that it is a process that gives communities the tools to apply the best available science and data to appropriately manage the human and environmental needs and uses of the marine areas. However, it needs an answer longer than that to be successful and I think long answers would notably vary amongst those engaged in Washington’s MSP process. A quick internet search of the question reinforces that assumption. Wikipedia may be the first result, but Google came up with nearly 2,000,000 possible answers including The White House and the European Commission. This may be the ultimate challenge of this planning process – that those involved appreciate the variety of perspectives on the process, goals and plan while still being able to find enough agreement to be successful.
  • How did you get involved and why are you involved in the planning process?
    One of my first tasks as staff for the GHC MRC was to help facilitate a forum on marine spatial planning in Aberdeen. The process has trudged along since and the MRCs have stayed involved with the goal of ensuring that the plan can have a positive impact on the communities of the coast. This involvement has included workshops, summits, The Big Chew, WCMAC 1 and WCMAC 2.
    Now that I am working as the Coastal Coordinator for TNC, I have the opportunity to further assist in the planning process with the deliberate objective of having a plan, and supporting tools, that will allow all decisions on the Washington coast be as informed and comprehensive possible.
  • What do you hope the WCMAC can accomplish with the Washington Marine Spatial Plan?
    The WCMAC has the opportunity, or possibly obligation, to have the Plan be influenced or driven by the needs and concerns of those who are dependent on our ocean and live in our coastal communities. My hope would be that WCMAC can provide recommendations, review and insight that takes full advantage of this opportunity. This would require honesty, trust, compromise and perseverance.
    And I would like to add that it is important to remember that our coast has tremendous and wide-reaching ecological and economic importance, and this is a plan of the State Government and the corresponding responsibilities will affect the plan.